OPPOSITE DAY

While I was having my quiet time this morning, a memory from years ago popped into my mind.  It was the memory of Opposite Day, a day my children would designate as a day when nothing was as it was expected.  A no-means-yes-and-yes-means-no day.  And that part of the day alone could trip up a conscientious mother into giving consent to something unintended.  Opposite Day might mean pajamas for day wear and pancakes for dinner.  It was a day to wear your shoes on the wrong feet.  On Opposite Day the only thing you could expect was the unexpected.  At this point you might be scratching your head and wondering why I would think about these things during my quiet time.  The simple explanation is that sometimes my mind is like a runaway train!  But I think I can offer a better explanation of how I got here.

A few days ago I was listening to evangelist Lance Wallnau speak about the trials we are enduring in 2020.  (Disclaimer: I really don’t know much about Wallnau or his theology but I thought this particular message was powerful.)  The year is not even half over, and already we have had a plague of biblical proportions, a global shutdown, economic free-fall, chaos on our streets, and the threat of flying creatures called murder hornets.  And now we have a tropical storm/hurricane bearing down on the gulf coast.  It makes me wonder how people could simultaneously quarantine and evacuate.  One particular point Wallnau made reached out and grabbed me, and has stayed with me.  He was speaking about the church coming out of quarantine when he said, “What if out of containment comes enlargement?” 

Those words eloquently expressed some thoughts I have been having on my own.  What if God has allowed us as believers to go through this time of isolation to prepare us for something big He is going to do?  That idea seems to me to be consistent with what I know about God.  He does the unexpected.  He acts in ways that are contrary to the ways we would expect because his ways are higher than ours (Isaiah 55:9).  A primary example of this would be in the way Jesus came to earth.  People expected a conquering king, but instead God sent a helpless baby born into humble circumstances.  

So what if God is preparing His church for something new, something big?  What if out of this time of isolation we experience a unity and togetherness like the early church described in Acts.  What if out of these economic hardships we discover riches we have taken for granted?  What if out of confusion comes understanding, out of pain comes rebirth, out of lockdown comes opportunity, and out of a time of quiet comes a Great Awakening?  What if the church becomes THE CHURCH?!  What if we see a new fulfillment of this promise from Isaiah 43:19:

For I am about to do something new. See, I have already begun! Do you not see it? I will make a pathway through the wilderness. I will create rivers in the dry wasteland.

Wallnau went on to issue these exhortations for believers during this time: we must seek His face, hear His voice, understand His will, and be his witnesses.  I don’t think I could say it any better.  This is our time.  Prepare to see God do something new.

THOUGHTS FROM MY GARDEN

It has been a beautiful day here in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  It was so chilly when I came out with my morning coffee that I thought about going back in for a blanket.  But it has quickly warmed up, and I believe the weatherman when he said this is the beginning of our summer.  I can already feel the heat, as well as those pesky biting flies and the no-see-ums.  I decided that this would be a good day to tackle some gardening chores I have been putting off.

I love our garden.  We purposely bought a house with a tiny lot, and my husband has turned it into a little slice of heaven.  I have to give him the credit, because he does all the heavy lifting.  I’m just on clean up.  Our subdivision was built on what was at one time a pasture.  It was almost completely devoid of trees, but thanks to our deed restrictions we now have many.  When we first moved in we could barely sit on our patio because of the wind.  Like the song says, Oklahoma is where the wind comes sweeping down the plains, and our backyard was like a wind tunnel for about five years until our landscaping matured.  Now it is a very pleasant place to sit and we have even installed some ceiling fans to stir up a breeze.  Time changes things.

My primary task this morning was to pull up some of the weeds that have begun to pop up.  While flowers and shrubs need a good bit of care, the weeds need no encouragement, even in a manicured garden such as ours.  It takes constant vigilance or they will take over.  Weeds are the default, landscaping takes care.

It occurred to me that our hearts are a lot like a garden.  It takes constant vigilance.  Those little sins can pop up almost unnoticed and take over if we are not careful.  We have a natural bent towards sin.  It is our default.  Those of us who are Christians have two competing natures: the old sinful nature (or the old man) and the new nature that is controlled by the Holy Spirit (new man). 

At the moment of conversion, the Christian receives a new nature. It happens instantly.  The Holy Spirit comes to dwell in us. However, sanctification is a continual process that lasts a lifetime.  It is the process of becoming holy, more like Jesus, and over the lifespan there will be many victories and defeats.  But the good news is our new nature has the capacity to resist sin, something we did not have before we were saved.

This new nature takes cultivation, just like my garden.  Although I have walked with God for many years, I still feel a bent towards sin.  Even the apostle Paul felt it.  In Romans 7 he writes about the battle that takes place within him.  He doesn’t do the good he wants to do, but instead he does the very evil he hates.  This battle is one that we will fight as long as we are here on earth.  It is a lot like fighting weeds.  That is why we are told to “get rid of anger, rage, malicious behavior, slander, and dirty language, (Colossians 3:8).”  We have to pull these sins up by their roots, and still they come back.  

I have learned that filling my garden with “good” plants is one way to choke out weeds.  But I can’t just plant them and forget them.  They must be watered and fertilized in order to grow and flourish.  Similarly, I must cultivate my new nature with Bible study, prayer, and worship.  When I neglect those things, the weeds (sins) pop up.  The old nature wins the battle.  

As believers we are encouraged to put to death the deeds of the body (Romans 8:13), to put to death those things that make a Christian sin (Colossians 3:5).  Even though we still have two natures, the old and the new, the new nature needs continual renewing (Colossians 3:5). This renewing is a lifetime process, but we are no longer under the control of sin (Romans 6:6).  And ultimately Christ will rescue us from “this body that is dominated by sin and death (Romans 7: 24).  The weeds will be permanently gone.  Thank you, Jesus!

IN TIMES LIKE THESE

Today s my grandmother’s birthday.  If my math is correct, she would be 121 years old.  Although she has been gone for almost 30 years, I still miss her every day.  She was the closest thing I had to a mother figure and I knew she loved me unconditionally.  When I was a lot smarter in my twenties and thirties, it annoyed me that she wanted to talk on the phone every day.  Every other day would have been fine with me.  Didn’t she know I was busy?  But oh, how I would love to have those phone calls back (grandchildren, take note)!  Oh, and why didn’t I get more photos of the two of us together?? I still remember the last time I saw her.  She was in the hospital in Dallas and I flew down to see her.  She knew, but I didn’t, that it would be our last time together.  She kept saying, “I’m so tired, but I’m afraid to go to sleep because when I wake up I won’t see you again.”  In my denial I thought, “Of course we will see each other again.  You will get well and go home and I will come back to Dallas for a visit.”  It didn’t hit me until I was on the airplane heading home that she was dying, and that she was right.  That was our last visit.  This story still brings tears to my eyes, and even though I have lots of grandchildren of my own, I still miss my Nenaw.  But I know without a doubt that we will meet again in Heaven.  She may be waiting at the gate for me even now!

I wonder what she would have thought about these Covid-19 quarantine days we are experiencing.  It just occurred to me the other day that she lived through the infamous Spanish flu we keep hearing about.  I don’t recall her ever mentioning that to me.  She would have been in her late teens, and probably knew someone who died from that plague.  She may even have contracted it herself.  

She had a perpetual cheerful attitude and didn’t dwell on negative things, but she lived through some tough times.  She endured two World Wars, sending both sons and a son-in-law (my dad) off to an unknown future.  I think about what it must have been like back then with no 24-hour news.  She didn’t have a television at that time so she must have relied on the radio and Movietone Newsreels if she went to the movies.  Even though she didn’t know if her boys would come back, she put one foot in front of the other and kept going.

Isn’t that similar to what we are doing now?  We don’t know where this virus will take us.  There is so much uncertainty about what lies ahead.  Our government officials as well as leaders in business, religion, and education are trying to make the wisest decisions they can.  Some of us are wondering how we will do school in the fall while others are wondering if our jobs will still be here when the economy is opened.  This virus has affected every area of our lives.  But we put one foot in front of the other and keep going.

There is a hymn that is stuck in my head: In Times Like These, by Ruth Caye Jones.  Ruth was a Pennsylvania pastor’s wife who was living through some tough times of her own.  It was 1943, a World War was raging, and this mother of five, like everyone else, saw the casualty lists and tried to make do with rationed supplies at home.  It was a time of great strain.  One day she opened her Bible to 2 Timothy 3 and read these words      

But understand this, that in the last days there will become times of great difficulty.

A song began to take shape in her mind, and we were left with these beautiful lyrics:

In times like these we need a Savior;
In times like these we need an anchor.
Be very sure, be very sure
Your anchor holds and grips the Solid Rock!

Although Ruth was inspired by the passage in 2 Timothy, she no doubt was familiar with another passage in Hebrews:

We have this hope as an anchor for the soul, firm and secure.  Heb. 6:19.

The entire world is living through difficult and uncertain times.  In times like these I need a Savior. And that Savior’s name is Jesus.  I know my soul is anchored in Him.  I don’t know what tomorrow will bring, but when I close my earthly eyes for the last time, I know His face will be the next one I see…maybe followed by my grandmother.

It Doesn’t Matter

Before he passed away, Charles Krauthammer wrote a book entitled Things That Matter.  Oh, how I miss that man with his wit and wisdom.  I wonder what he would say about our current state of affairs, being locked down as we fight off the deadly and costly Corona Virus.  I find myself frequently thinking about those words, “things that matter.”  What really matters in these days?  

There have been many blessings hidden among the horrors of this pandemic we are enduring.  We are spending more time with family, we are praying more, we are reaching out to friends, and we are resting.  Resting from all our frantic activity that distracts us from enjoying the most valuable aspects of this life we are given.  One of the things I have noticed in my own life is how many times during the day I tell myself, “That really doesn’t matter.”

This virus is helping me to tease out the important from the unimportant…or the less important. Things that I thought were really important are really not any more.  We gave up our vacation rental because we are not going to be able to take out family beach vacation this year.  But that is not nearly as important as having a healthy intact family.  A vacation, while nice, is just not that important.  My hair and nails could use some attention, but I am learning to make do.  I don’t plan to rush into a nail salon the minute they reopen.  Because it’s not important.  An entire season of pretty spring clothes is going to come and go.  Because where would I wear them?  I look around at my house and think it could do with some updating, but it’s not really important.  If some knickknack is out of place, I may or may not adjust it.  Because it doesn’t matter.  Fortunately, I still have some Charmin, but if I run out the world won’t come to an end.  I have even heard some talk about not having football in the fall.  Whoa!!!  Now that matters!

Joking aside, I’ve noticed this “not important” thing even in my thought life.  I am letting go of some things that have bothered me in the past.  Old hang-ups?  Not important.  Past slights?  Letting them go.  In fact, I am even finding them laughable.  I haven’t mastered this yet, but I am beginning to give grace to those who withhold grace from me.  Because you know what else is not important?  Me!

Letting go of the things that don’t matter is making room for the things that do.  Every morning my first thought upon awakening is, “Thank you, Lord for protecting me through the night.”  I check in with my children to make sure they are all alive and well.  Preserving life matters.  Not only has my prayer life improved, but our prayer life as a couple has vastly improved.  We have developed a new prayer system.  Every day we especially pray for a specific family member.  And God is telling us how to pray for each one of them.  I have more time to spend in God’s word.  I am writing notes and making phone calls.  Jerry and I laugh more (and when necessary, we socially distance)!  And I am appreciating life.  I am more grateful.  Grateful for the big things and the small.  

Lives matter, and those who work to save lives matter. Our medical professionals who are on the front line matter as well as the hospital cleaning staff who work behind the scenes. Those who work at “essential” businesses matter. It matters that people are dying alone and that numbers are so great that they are being buried in mass graves. Smaller things matter too. It matters that I can’t go to church or hug my grandchildren. It matters that children can’t go to school, that college campuses are empty, that proms and graduations have been cancelled. These are all important things.

Charles Krauthammer would say the thing that matters most is politics, that we must secure life, liberty, and the right to pursue happiness before any of the other things we enjoy can come to be.  While I understand his thoughtful argument, and while I would agree that politics is vitally important, I don’t think it is the most important.  Because politics is subordinate to God.  The Scriptures tell us that God holds the heart of the king in His hands, and He can turn it any way He wants (Prov. 21:1).  He controls the course of world events; he removes kings and sets up other kings. He gives wisdom to the wise and knowledge to the scholars (Dan. 2:21).  Therefore the things that are important to God must be the things that are important to me.  Jesus taught that loving God and loving my neighbor are the most important.  If we master those, everything else will fall into place.

This Corona virus is important!  But even it is subservient to the power of God.  In my Bible study we are digging into the book of Malachi.  Twenty-four times Malachi refers to God as The Lord of Hosts.  He is Commander in Chief of the armies of heaven.  He could unleash them against this virus and it would be gone in a heartbeat.  And yet, He delays.  

I am wondering if He is giving us this time out, this global shutdown, to determine what is really important.  We keep asking when things will return to normal but maybe that is the wrong question. Maybe we should be asking what God wants our new normal to be.  How does He want me to live now and in a post Corona world?  What things really matter?

HOPE

Is there anything more hopeful than spring?  It is a chilly and rainy March morning here in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  But as I look out my windows I see the promise of spring.  The backyard is filled with jonquils, budding trees, and a few irises waiting their turn.  Cardinals and robins are singing and chirping, announcing an end to the barrenness of winter.  In the front yard, our tulips and hyacinths are blooming amidst their bed of violas and pansies.  Some pink is beginning to pop out on our azalea bushes.  Spring is God’s promise to us that there is life after death, that the cold and barrenness of winter will not last forever.  Spring must follow winter.  The poet Pablo Neruda says, “You can cut all the flowers but you cannot keep the Spring from coming.”  

From a Christian perspective spring speaks of the resurrection, of new birth, of life.  We celebrate Christmas in the winter, when everything is dead.  It is a picture of Christ bringing light and hope to a dark and fallen world.  And we celebrate Easter in the spring, a visual reminder of the promise of Jesus: “The one who believes in me will live, even though they die (John 11:25b).”  Spring brings us hope.  

But in order for there to be a resurrection there must first be a death.  For years I have been praying for another Great Awakening, a revival to sweep across America.  I am wondering if this pandemic is it.  Since we are all social distancing, I don’t have a lot of data to support this thought.  We are even having church on line, so I can’t look around and see if we are more crowded than usual.  But if my social media pages are any indication, I would say that people are praying much more, and they are inviting others to join them.  We are all asking God to rid the world of this terrible virus, to save us.  Isn’t it interesting that all our idols are being repudiated, just like the gods of Egypt in Exodus?  The gods of entertainment, sports, careers, and the big god of Wall Street are all helpless in the face of this virus.  Our hope cannot lie in a something it must lie in a someone.  The only “god” that can save us is the capital G God of the Bible, God Almighty. And we are crying out to Him for help.

But there are two parts to a Great Awakening: a turning to God and a turning away from sin.  We are so accustomed to the stench of sin we don’t even smell it any more.  I have found that the more I pray, two things happen.  I get to know God better, but I also get to know myself better.  When I am in the presence of a holy God, I am aware of my own sinfulness, my absolute neediness.  I see myself more clearly.  I am reminded of the prophet Isaiah when he had a vision of the Lord, “high and lifted up (Isaiah 6: 1).”  Isaiah was overwhelmed by his own unworthiness.  “Woe is me!  For I am lost; for I am a man of unclean lips and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips: (v. 5)”

Where is the hope?  Our hope is eternal and alive.  It lies in the power of a good God to keep His promises. 

if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.  2 Chronicles 7:14

Even though we are in the midst of a great and unprecedented challenge, spring is a reminder that God is still on His throne.  He offers hope.  How will we respond?  

FOR SUCH A TIME AS THIS

I woke up this morning trying to remember how many days we have been dealing with this coronavirus.  I know it has been in the world for months, but how many days have we been dealing with it on a personal level.  How many days has it interrupted our normal routine, affected our decisions, and generally inconvenienced us?  I don’t think it has been very long—maybe just days—but I am losing track of time.  We wake up every day in bizarro world, the twilight zone, dystopia.  It is hard to believe that the world has become so utterly shaken in such a short time.

I am a slow learner.  Oh I can quickly memorize useless facts and figures, but life lessons are more difficult to get through this stubborn will of mine.  But in my later, more mature years I have realized that when the Lord allows me to be stilled, sometimes flattened, He has something valuable to teach me, something to share with me, or some instruction for me.  And now he has used this time of isolation to still me 

For example, He is reminding me of the difference between wants and needs.  I do not need 40 cases of toilet paper!  I don’t even need most of the things on my list.  As Jerry and I were praying this morning, I had to thank God for supplying everything we need today.  Everything we need and then some.  It really is not a hardship to be asked to stay at home in a comfortable house with plenty of things to occupy my time and thoughts.  I know we will get through this because I know my God.  We might not get through it in the way I imagine, but we will get through it in a way that will be for our good and His glory.  C. S. Lewis said that God whispers to us in our pleasures but shouts to us in our pain.  He may be shouting to His church.

I believe God has a bigger purpose for me than stockpiling groceries or watching Netflix in this moment.  A bigger purpose for all of us.  For months and months God has been teaching me about prayer.  Church, I believe it is time to ramp up our prayers, to pray with fervor and intensity.  For years I have been asking God to send another Great Awakening and I believe we could be on the threshold of such a revival.  God invites us to partner with Him in prayer.  Sometimes we think that prayer is such a small thing.  We think there should be other more important things we should do.  But prayer is the thing!  There is no activity more important.

God has ordained all our days.  He knew when we would be born, and He knew all about this coronavirus.  Maybe we were placed here at this moment “for such a time as this (Esther 4:14)!”  This may be our commission for these days of isolation.  

I keep silently singing the words of the old B. B. McKinney hymn, Lord Send a Great Revival. And I pray, Lord send a great revival, and let it begin with me.

Who Do You Trust?

It is very early in the morning, still dark outside.  I am reflecting over the last week.  What a week this has been!  A roller coaster!  A deluge of strange events, dystopian sights, and new words.  Coronavirus.  How it has changed our lives in a week.  People getting sick and people afraid of getting sick.  People trapped on cruise ships.  No one at Saint Peter’s Square or the Eiffel Tower.  Times Square practically empty on a Friday night.  Events cancelled.  No sports!  Store shelves empty and people afraid of running out of toilet paper when there is not even a real toilet paper emergency.  The stock market!  People watching their 401Ks plummet in a downhill slide so rapid it almost gives one whiplash.  And then, after the President speaks in the Rose Garden a 1000-point gain.  What will next week bring?  And the new words and phrases that have become a part of our vocabulary: self-quarantine, social distancing, and respiratory hygiene.  Who knew we needed lessons on how to wash our hands?  Universities sending their students home or putting all classes online.  People working from home.  And churches cancelling services.  Listen, when Disney and Apple stores shut down and Tom Hanks gets sick we know we are in trouble!

In the midst of this wild week, we are dealing with our own personal changes…just like everyone else.  My mother-in-law, Jerry’s 98-year old mom is declining and we need to make some changes for her.  Hopefully she will still be able to live at home, but she is falling frequently and her cognition is not what it has always been.  We spent a few days in Dallas with her…Jerry going to her doctor with her and me researching resources to help her.  I also got a chance to visit with my 94-year old mother the day before nursing homes went on lockdown.  “Lockdown.”  There is another word.

I’m listening to how my daughters and my friends have been affected.  We all have a story.  Everything is changing and the future is so uncertain.  I remember a television show in the 50s that gave a young Johnny Carson his start.  It was called Who Do You Trust?  So this morning in my very early Saturday morning quiet time, God reminds me that I can really only trust Him.  He never changes.  

Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever.  Hebrews 13:8  

Thank you, Lord.  Furthermore, He saw this week coming and He has it under control.  We plan and prepare and think we have our futures all laid out and then something happens to remind us that control is just an illusion.  The stock market can never really provide security.  Our aging loved ones are going to leave us some day.  And some day, other people will be making decisions about us.  In spite of all our preparations, someday our own health will fail.  We will die.  

Where is my bottom line, my investment with a floor, my safety net?  I can plan and prepare (and we should!) but the world can change in an instant.  I keep thinking of Psalm 20:7:

Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we will trust in the name of the Lord our God.  

Eventually I will lose all my chariots and horses.  They cannot protect me from every eventuality.  But God.  God remains.  He is constant.  And He loves and cares for me.

The Lord is the everlasting God, the Creator of the ends of the earth.  He does not faint or grow weary; his understanding is unsearchable.  Isaiah 40: 28b 

I think I’ll go have another cup of coffee.

STANDING FIRM

For many of us in the Baby Boomer generation, a good many of our battles are behind us.  We survived childhood, battling measles, chicken pox, mumps and the practices of drinking from the garden hose and riding in the back window of the car.  God was definitely sending His angels to watch over us.  My mother’s biggest fear for her children was polio and she made us take a nap every day during the summer (somehow summer was worse for polio).  I hated those naps; now I love them!  

We made it through our teenage years with no atomic bomb, but we had those drills to prepare us.  Although too many of us did not survive the Vietnam War, those of us who were fortunate were able to begin our adult lives.  Some of us went to college, some got jobs, and some got married and started families.  We survived those early years of adulthood, stretching our paychecks and saving our Green Stamps.  We had babies and managed to keep them alive (more angels!), we worked hard to raise them right and teach them about the Lord. Then they left us, becoming responsible adults, eventually with families of their own.  

We became grandparents and had to relearn everything about babies because we found out we didn’t know anything.  The rules changed!  Do they sleep on their backs or stomachs?  We struggled with complicated car seats and strollers.  I still have flashbacks to the parking lot at Dillard’s trying to figure out how to fold the stroller and get it back in the car while a toddler howled in her car seat.  

Many of us are now retired. We have completed are careers and are now finding new ways to be useful. In theory we have more time now, but the time whizzes by at breakneck speed! Some of us are now (gasp) great-grandparents and chuckle at our kids wrestling with car seats.  But one of my favorite pictures is of my daughter falling in love with her new baby granddaughter.  Pure love!  

So even though there are challenges ahead, we have completed the biggest part of our earthly assignments.  As I thought abut these things, this verse from my quiet time particularly resonated with me: …”and having done all, to stand firm,” Ephesians 6;13b. We still need to stand firm, and that might be our most important job right now.  

My Bible study group (https://www.communitybiblestudy.org) has been doing a study called Return to Jerusalem and currently we are looking at the life of Nehemiah and the rebuilding of the Jerusalem wall.  In last week’s lesson the Jews completed building the wall (in only 52 days!) so Nehemiah’s next job was to make sure what they had accomplished was protected.  He needed to stand firm. He did this by appointing gatekeepers to control who came in and left the city and guards to patrol the walls and guard the houses. 

As I was reading these words I thought of my family and especially my grandchildren.  As parents and grandparents  we have done our jobs but we need guards at the gates and watchers on the walls.  I am so grateful that all my children and grandchildren have a saving relationship with the Lord, but that relationship must be carefully guarded because we have an enemy who would love to come in and confuse them and capture their hearts and minds. My job now is to be a watchman, to stand firm.

Although I don’t have as much daily influence as I did when my children were small, I have all of the armor of God that Ephesians 6 describes: the belt of Truth, the breastplate of righteousness, the shoes that equip me to spread the gospel, the shield of faith, the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit (God’s Word).  And then verse 18 admonishes us to pray at all times, to keep alert with all perseverance, and to pray for all the saints.  I love how The Message version completes this verse:

In the same way, prayer is essential in this ongoing warfare. Pray hard and long. Pray for your brothers and sisters. Keep your eyes open. Keep each other’s spirits up so that no one falls behind or drops out.

This is how I can guard the gates and keep watch on the walls.  I can pray.  Jerry and I have really ramped up our prayer lives this year.  And although many of my big battles are behind me, my job as a guard and watchman is not over.  This is how I stand firm.

POWER SOURCE

We are all so dependent on power.  If you have ever had a power outage, you know the helpless feeling as you wait for power to be restored.  At our house we are having issues with power and connectivity.  Most of it is self-inflicted because we changed Internet providers.  Once we get everything connected things should run smoothly, but oh my goodness!  We have a lot of devices, and when I say we, I actually mean me.  I love gadgets.  But when they don’t work they become a source of frustration.  

Jerry and I watch a good deal of streaming television, so the first order of business was to connect all of our TVs (yes, we have many) to the Internet.  Then we connected our phones and iPads.  We thought we were pretty much set after that, except Jerry struggled to set up a new email account.  I admit it was difficult for some reason, so I am just keeping my Gmail account.  Easy.  Later, I realized all my Amazon Echo devices were down, and one Echo Dot just would NOT connect to the new Internet.  Finally, after several hard resets I got it up and running.  I told you I have a lot of gadgets! 

So this morning, after getting everything connected (I thought) to the new Internet, I discovered that we have a faulty power outlet at our house.  It just happens to be the outlet I use to charge all my devises at night.  Even my watch must be plugged in.  So this morning when I opened my iPad, I was surprised to find that I only had 28% battery left.  Nothing charged overnight!  We checked the reset buttons and then the breaker box.  I guess we will need to replace that outlet.  When I sat down to my laptop to Google electrical outlets (and there are so many fancy ones!) I realized I hadn’t connected it to the new Internet.  Network connection was a quick and easy fix, but just writing these words has made me realize how dependent I am on my power sources.

All of this has happened at a time when God has had me studying and writing a conference talk about prayer.  I want to pray powerful prayers and I am completely dependent I am on my heavenly power source.  When I lose my connection to God, I am weak and my battery runs low.  Trying to do what I am called to do on 28% doesn’t work.  Just as I have to recharge all my devises, I must recharge my heart.  I must be connected to God’s network if I am to be effective.  

I read that the biggest power sources in the United States are the Grand Coulee Dam and the Palo Verde Nuclear power plant.  I can’t even wrap my brain around the amount of power they produce every second.  And yet, our God is infinitely more powerful. 

There is so much power in prayer.  I want to pray big, bold, fervent, persistent prayers!  Importunate prayers.  Jerry and I are doing something new this year.  Since we are both retired, we have more time for morning prayers.  We decided to pray specifically for one family member each morning.  We have nineteen in our immediate family, so when we get to day twenty we begin praying for our extended family, our friends, our church, our country, and our world.  As we have practiced this way of praying, I’ve noticed out prayers have become bolder and more specific.  One of our first sermons of the New Year was a challenge to pray Ephesians 1:19-21 for our children and grandchildren.  It is a passage about knowing God’s power.  What a privilege it is to walk right into the throne room and speak to God on behalf of my family.  I can’t wait to see how God answers these prayers.  

 “I ask that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened, so that you may know the hope of His calling, the riches of His glorious inheritance in the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power toward us who believe, according to the working of his great might that he worked in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly places, far above all rule and authority and power and dominion, and above every name that is named, not only in this age but also in the one to come.”  Eph. 1:19-21 ESV

THE END OF AN ERA

We did something big today, something I never imagined we would do, but it was time.  We cancelled the newspaper.  I guess there are fewer and fewer of us who even subscribe to the paper anymore.  I don’t think any of my adult children do.  Maybe home delivery will die out with Baby Boomers.

I have been thinking about all the years I have enjoyed getting and reading the paper.  When we lived in Dallas and even when we moved to Tulsa, we took both the morning and afternoon newspapers.  The morning paper we read rather quickly, just to get the news.  But when the afternoon paper came it was a time to sit down and relax and read more of the features.  Maybe work a crossword puzzle or read Dear Abby.  We relied on the paper to tell us what the weather would be tomorrow, what was on television tonight, and what was on special at Safeway.  We needed the daily newspaper. Even the classified ads were interesting.  Remember the personal column?

When I was a little girl I spent large chunks of the summer with my grandparents.  One of my favorite memories is sitting on my grandmother’s porch swing with her as she read the afternoon paper (The Dallas Times Herald).  She would usually cut an apple for us, and she would read the comics to me and then read the rest of the news to herself.  It was a time when she rested from her domestic activities and was still.  And I could snuggle up next to her.

I guess in the history of the world, the ways we have gotten news have changed over time and have largely been driven by technology.  Before the printing press was invented, news was transmitted by word of mouth.  Surely that couldn’t have been very reliable.  Newspapers became the primary means of journalism in the 18th and 19th centuries.  Then came radio and television, and now we can transmit news instantly via the Internet.  I was reminded the other day about newsreels that were shown in theaters before the feature film.  My grandmothers both had sons who fought in World War II.  I can imagine them sitting next to the radio or watching those newsreels, hoping for some good news.  Then later we all tuned in to Walter Cronkite or Huntley and Brinkley to get the day’s news.  The first time I can remember constant news coverage of an event was when Kennedy was assassinated.  But even then our newspapers were important.  Now we have the 24-hour news cycle and it sometimes drives me crazy.  I really don’t want to see Adam Schiff’s face again!  And is it any more reliable?

I hate to see the demise of the written word.  Even though I get a lot of my news from the Internet, I have to scroll past videos to see something in print.  While I will miss the idea of the daily paper, I’m not sure there is very much reality left to miss.  The Tulsa World has gotten thinner and thinner, with more ads as fillers.  By the time the news is delivered to my door, it is old news.  I have already watched it on television.  And it keeps going up in price.  It just doesn’t make sense to spend so much money on something that often goes straight into the trash.  I realize by cancelling my subscription I am becoming part of the problem, but it just isn’t worth the expense any more.

I would be remiss if I didn’t say a word about the Good News, the Bible. Even though it was written centuries ago, it is still fresh and still relevant. Everything changes, but the Word of God never does. It always gives me just what I need for my day.

“The grass withers and the flower fades, but the word of the Lord remains forever.” 1 Peter 1: 24b

So goodbye, Tulsa World.  I’m breaking up with you.  Maybe I will change my mind and come back if you are still around, but don’t count on it.  Thanks for all the memories but for now, I will have my morning coffee with the Good News.